Saturday, June 11, 2011

MS

The deepest, most soul-crushing of tragedies that can befall man are those from 'silly' causes. Something that works as a matter of routine for everyone so much that it's not even a thought that crosses your mind, but alas, a trivial random event so fully exposes the horrific fragility of being human.

Tragedies stemming from acts of God or 'great' events that feature in a long-arc narrative, or as identifiable to some deep cause, are relatively 'manageable'. It takes superhuman mental strength to deal with an event unique to you in impact, but is unclassifiable to most other people. The enormous guilt that comes with it, with a post-mortem of every decision that lead to it no matter how far away back in time or relevance, no matter how deceiving the clarity of hindsight; the constant reminder of what could have been; the constant self-flagellation, ... I shudder at the thought.

8 comments:

Varun Narasimhachar said...

The Butterfly Effect giving you butterflies in your stomach?

In such situations, I convince myself that there's still providence in those seemingly "silly" or "incidental" tragedies. Statistically, I've been able to find rationalizations remarkably often. My philosophy: where the available information affords ambiguity, believe in whatever is the most comfortable belief.

S said...

I don't know what this is about, and you have my sympathies.
But in case it helps: things "unique" to oneself are almost always not unique; one just needs to talk to enough people to discover this (always startling) fact.

Atulbv said...

chill maga..

SpeedySynapse said...

seek the purpose.

- SpeedySynapse (war.on.sex@gmail.com)

Varun said...

I agree with you, and I have little else to add except to recommend a book: try The Consolations of Philosophy by Alain de Botton. He offers consolations for all this sort of stuff: unpopularity, inadequacy (including sexual ones), lack of money, failures in love, unexpected tragedy, etc. He uses the lives of philosophers from Socrates to Schopenhauer as examples to illustrate his points. It's written in this mildly ironic, typically British tone that I found quite appealing. 

If you don't have the time for a book or can't find this, try his TED talk as an appetizer (you may have already seen it, of course). 

Speedy Synapse said...

sada pashyanthi soorayaha thaddhishnoho param padam |

When one knows the purpose, the world is a feather on his shoulders. This may be your last chance. Get in touch.

Nithya said...

Hot chocolate cures almost anything! Wait, lets strike the almost out. 

KVM said...

Thanks, I'm a fan too and have read most of his books. And I like exactly the same thing about him - a gentle, nuanced "typically British" style of writing :)